Best Turntables of 2020

Best Turntables of 2020

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If you’re looking for the best turntables to play your old record collections, this is the right place.

We’re quite aware that finding the best turntables to match with the morden day record players can be stressful. For this reason, we’ve taking time and resource to search for only the best turntables available in the market today.

Interestingly, most of the turntables we found can easily be connected to your PC via Bluetooth or USB so you could rip those old record of yours and play it everywhere you go.

In addition, we’ll hint you on all the little details you need to know before choosing the best turntables for your listening pleasure.

So, irrespective of what you need a turntable for, we’ve got them all covered in this list of the 10 best turntables.

Buyer Guide: 5 Things to Consider Before Buying a Turn Table

Belt drive vs. direct drive: This reveals to you how the engine is associated with the platter, and why it matters.

Expert DJs love direct-drive turntables since they get up to speed quickly when the engine is turned on, and the platter spins free of opposition when the engine is shut down.

In case you’re not a DJ, you’ll need a belt-driven ‘table. A flexible band associated with the engine turns the platter, which eliminates motor commotion, and helps bring out more subtlety from a recording.

Cartridge: Most turntables accompany a cartridge pre-mounted on the tonearm. The cartridge contains the stylus —which the vast majority of us calmly allude to as a “needle” or “pickup” — that reads the record’s grooves and produces sound. The installed cartridge is normally a decent entry-level decision, however, numerous music lovers choose to upgrade to get significantly more grounded execution.

Manual vs. automated: This element tells you the amount you’ll need to connect with your turntable as it starts and stops playing a record.

  • Manual: With the assistance of a manual switch, you physically lift the tonearm and spot the needle in the record’s lead section and lift it off toward the finish of aside. A computerized system can present noise, so manual activity is standard for the individuals who care more about sound quality than accommodation.
  • Semi-automatic: You kick things off by physically bringing down the tonearm. At the point when the record is done, the turntable returns the tonearm and closes off the engine. You don’t need to stress over the stylus knocking around toward the end of the song while you’re up to your elbows in an assignment.
  • Completely automatic: With a completely programmed turntable, you push a button and leave. The tonearm moves into position and delicately drops the needle onto the main edge of the record. At the point when the last melody is finished, the tonearm lifts itself up, comes back to its resting position, and closes the engine.

USB output: You purchase a turntable since you love simple sounds. Be that as it may, a few ‘tables have an element that gives you a chance to make computerized duplicates of your preferred collections so you can safeguard them and take the music with you when you go out. In the event that that sounds great to you, search for a turntable with a USB output.

Turntable Mats and Slipmats: DJs use mats to decrease friction on their records, yet they are significant for each turntable. They improve sound quality and shield your records from getting harmed. Try not to attempt to play a record without one. Felt mats are the most widely recognized sort because of their flexibility, spectrum mats are best for opening up the sound range and elastic mats diminish vibrations for sound clarity.

Best Turntables Compilation Chart

Name Features Where to Buy
Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB

Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB

USB, Direct drive motor Get it on Amazon
Audio-Technica AT-LP60

Belt drive motor, no USB Get it on Amazon
Denon DP-300F

Denon DP-300F

Belt drive, no USB Get it on Amazon
Fluance RT81

Fluance RT81

Belt drive, no USB Get it on Amazon
Pro-Ject Debut Carbon

Fluance RT81

Belt drive, no USB Get it on Amazon
Rega Planar 1

Rega Planar 1

Belt drive, no USB Get it on Amazon
Marantz TT-15S1

Belt drive, no USB Get it on Amazon
Clearaudio Concept

Clearaudio Concept

Belt drive, no USB Get it on Amazon
Sony PS-HX500

Sony PS-HX500

USB, belt drive Get it on Amazon
Cambridge Audio Alva

Cambridge Audio Alva TT turntable

Direct drive, no USB Get it on Amazon

Best Turntables in Outputs Ports and Drives

Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB

Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB

The best starter turntable with all the features you’ll ever need

Dimensions: 450.0 mm (17.72″) W x 352.0 mm (13.86″) D x 157.0 mm (6.1″) H | Motor: Direct drive | Platter: Die-cast aluminum | Phono preamp: Yes | USB: Yes | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45, 78 rpm | Stylus: AT95E

The Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB is the best early on a turntable for vinyl lovers. Out of the box, it includes the capacity to play 33 ⅓, 45 and 78 RPM, this implies there will never be a collection you can’t play. There’s likewise a worked in phono preamp so you never need to stress over finding one all alone.

New record collectors will love the simple arrangement and highlights while more vetted clients will love the alternative to dial in the vertical tracking point, tracking force and effectively replaceable headshell. Indeed, it would seem that a Technics SL-1200 sham however at a small amount of the value, it’s completely justified, despite all the trouble.

The AT-LP120-USB likewise accompanies a USB yield that enables you to record your record accumulation in the event that you need. Basically, this deck finds some kind of harmony of usability for starters while as yet including some further developed highlights for you to develop into.

Pros Cons
Great sound quality for the price Plastic build
Great for newbies and pros alike Mediocre USB output

Sony PS-HX500

Sony PS-HX500

A well-rounded beginner turntable with some nagging flaws

Dimensions: 16.54” x 13.78” x 4.92”; (W x D x H) | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Aluminum Diecast Alloy | Phono preamp: Yes | USB: Yes 44.1kHz / 48kHz / 96kHz / 192kHz (16bit / 24bit) | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: Sony 9-885-210-05

The Sony PS-HX500 is an extraordinary passage level turntable for those simply beginning with record collecting. It’s champion component is its capacity to record Hi-Res sound from its USB yield in 96kHz/24bit goals. This is an astounding component for those hoping to digitize their records.

Regarding sound quality, the Sony PS-HX500 sounds roomy and gives great detail. In any case, the included needle sounds somewhat harsh and sibilant now and again and comes up short on the goals of progressively costly cartridges.

While some may like the moderate plan of Sony, it’s absolutely forgettable and its plastic form leaves a great deal to be wanted. Taking care of the turntable once a day leaves us needing progressively premium materials that don’t shake.

Pros Cons
Hi-Res audio USB recording The plastic build feels cheap
Good sound quality for the price Forgettable design

Cambridge Audio Alva TT

Cambridge Audio Alva TT

Old meets new in this wireless Hi-Res turntable

Dimensions: 17.12” x 14.48” x 5.47”; (W x D x H) | Motor: Direct drive | Platter: Polyoxymethylene | Phono preamp: No | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: Elliptical

This brand is one of the most costly turntables on this list. Be that as it may, it’s exceptionally determined and means to convey all the numerous and different points of interest of the vinyl format with not very many of the trade-offs.

In reality, the ability to stream remotely to a 24bit/48kHz aptX HD standard makes it number one of the best turntables in the market. No other phonograph from any better-settled brand in this kind of market – Rega, for example, or Clearaudio – can approach this degree of comfort.

Pros Cons
Hi-res aptX HD wireless streaming Built to last
Simple to set up Not the last word in dynamism

Best Turntables in Price and Affordability

Audio-Technica AT-LP60

Audio-Technica AT-LP60

Dummy-proof automatic turntable for beginners on a budget

Dimensions: 360.0 mm (14.17″) W x 97.5 mm (3.84″) H x 356.0 mm (14.02″) D | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Die-cast aluminum | Phono preamp: Yes | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: ATN3600

In case you’re not hoping to drop a fortune on the best turntable on the world and don’t really think about crushing each and every drop of constancy from your LPs, the Audio-Technica AT-LP60 is an ideal beginning stage. It’s compact, can play most vinyl and is by a wide margin the cheapest turntable we have on this rundown. It’s likewise absolutely programmed, which means it’ll line a record and return the arm to resting position without requiring a manual switch.

The main proviso with this cheap turntable is that it won’t grow with you as your vinyl accumulation grows. The in-built phono preamp means you’re left with it, be that as it may, you can supplant the needle once it wears out.

While there are less expensive, inadequately designed turntables available, it’s not justified, despite any potential benefits, as you risk harming your valuable records with ineffectively adjusted and inappropriately weighted tonearms. Vinyl is costly so we suggest the AT-LP60 for starters simply hoping to begin.

Pros Cons
Fully automatic Can’t replace the cartridge
Excellent value Passable sound

Denon DP-300F

Denon DP-300F

A gorgeous, fully automatic turntable that doesn’t break the bank

Dimensions: 17-3/32 x 4-51/64 x 15″ (434 x 122 x 381 mm); (WxHxD) | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Die-cast aluminum | Phono preamp: Yes | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: DSN-85

The Denon DP-300F is a flawless turntable that sounds similar in the same class as it looks. The included DSN-85 cartridge isn’t the most exact however it tries to figures out how to make your music sound breezy and sensibly nitty-gritty, particularly at its cost. You’ll have to spend much more money to hear more detail.

While the DP-300F comes up short on the USB yields of a portion of the turntables recorded here, it’s as yet an extraordinary beginning turntable for any individual who wouldn’t like to physically line their collections or have a propensity for nodding off while tuning in to music. The Denon’s programmed beginning/stop highlight implies your needle won’t be worn out toward the end of the record as the arm quickly returns when a collection is done.

Manufacture quality is good for an all-plastic turntable, however, its buttons feel modest – a minor issue yet shouldn’t be a major issue for you. On the off chance that the Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB doesn’t accommodate your choice, consider the Denon DP-300F.

Pros Cons
Fully automatic Plastic build
Great sound for the price Buttons feel cheap

Best Turntables in Sound

Fluance RT81

Fluance RT81

An alternative to the AT-LP120-USB for those who don’t need USB

Dimensions: 16.5” x 5.5” x 13.75” | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Aluminum | Phono preamp: Yes | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: ATN95E

The Fluance RT81 is a superb starter turntable for the devotee. It’s easy to set up and use for novices yet you can change out the cartridge to squeeze out more performance later on. Novices additionally won’t need to stress over getting a different phono preamp, as one is in-built. In any case, you can turn it off if you need to utilize a superior outer preamp.

The main drawback is that Fluance’s publicized “auto-off” highlight just turns off the platter, anticipating extreme needle wear yet despite everything you’ll need to restore the arm to its resting place yourself. You’ll additionally need to physically line records, which isn’t a major issue however is an interesting point for those searching for a completely programmed turntable. The Denon DP-300F is an incredible decision for those searching for a completely computerized record listening background.

Pros Cons
Great sound for the price Poor vibration damping
Decent sounding phono preamp No auto returning tonearm

Rega Planar 1

Rega Planar 1

One of the best entry-level hi-fi turntables for tinkerers

Dimensions: 17.5″ (450mm) W by 4.5″ (115mm) H by 15″ (385mm) D | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Phenolic resin | Phono preamp: No | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: Rega Carbon

There’s a ton of discussion about whether the Rega Planar 1 or the Pro-Ject Debut Carbon is the best passage level Hi-Fi turntable. Although, it’s a close match and there is no winner, each giving a brilliant beginning spot to audiophiles on a spending limit.

While the Rega may come up short on the extravagant carbon tonearm of the Pro-Ject, the Planar 1 still sounds superb and is all around damped with its phenolic pitch platter. Furthermore, for amateurs, the Rega Planar 1 is still simple to set up, however you’ll need to get your very own phono preamp.

Eventually, the Rega Planar 1 just sounds so great that it’s difficult to blame it to an extreme. Vocals are uncovering and you can hear the surface from instruments like the violin. The included Rega Carbon cartridge is nothing unique yet figures out how to be an incredible counterpart for the turntable. It’s an intense decision between Planar 1 and the Debut Carbon however you can’t turn out badly with either.

Pros Cons
Excellent sound quality Manual speed change
Easy to set up, even for newbies No phono preamp included

Clearaudio Concept

A stunningly beautiful mid-range hi-fi turntable

Dimensions: 16.54” x 13.78” x 4.92”; (W x D x H) | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Polyoxymethylene | Phono preamp: No | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45, 78 rpm | Stylus: Clearaudio Concept MC

On the off chance that the Clearaudio Concept and Marantz TT-15S1 appear to be recognizable, that is on the grounds that the Marantz was worked by Clearaudio to Marantz’s specifications. This implies everything about the incredible form nature of the Marantz persists to the Clearaudio Concept (for example this is a turntable that is as dazzling as it sounds).

One little yet prominent difference between the Marantz and the Clearaudio is the capacity to play 78 rpm records. While a great many people will never run over 78s, it’s decent to realize that the Clearaudio Concept is fit for playing them. The Concept likewise has a convenient speed dial on the plinth, which means you don’t need to swap the belt position physically.

Concerning negatives, the Clearaudio Concept has no remarkable blemishes. Indeed, it’s costly however despite everything you’re getting a deal in this value run.

Pros Cons
Excellent build quality Expensive
Detailed, rich sound

Best Turntables in Design

Marantz TT-15S1

Marantz TT-15S1

Go pro with this high-end turntable

Dimensions: 440mm x 350mm x 110mm; (W x D x H) | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: High-Density Acrylic | Phono preamp: No | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: Clearaudio Virtuoso

The Marantz TT-15S1 costs a genuine piece of progress, however, you’re really getting an exceptional deal. The Clearaudio Virtuoso included with the turntable is $1000 when acquired independently. Furthermore, you get an executioner tonearm and exquisite turntable at a value that is certainly speculation, yet not unreasonable.

So what does the Marantz TT-15S1 get you over the challenge? Attention to detail. Pretty much all aspects of the turntable have been poured over to be as well as can be expected to be at the cost. The fit and finish are phenomenal and it’s a joy to deal with the excellent segments. This is a turntable you’ll wind up respecting its visual and discernible characteristics.

Amateurs ought not to get this turntable as it requires more learning to set up appropriately than the passage level turntables on this rundown. In any case, in case you’re prepared to take your record collection and tuning in to the following level, the Marantz TT-15S1 is the ideal spot to begin.

Pros Cons
Gorgeous design Price is an investment
Excellent attention to detail


Pro-Ject Debut Carbon

Pro-Ject Debut Carbon

An excellent entry-level turntable for vinyl enthusiasts

Dimensions: 415 x 118 x 320mm (WxHxD) | Motor: Belt drive | Platter: Aluminum | Phono preamp: No | USB: No | Speeds: 33 ⅓, 45 rpm | Stylus: Ortofon 2M Red

From this point forward things begin to get somewhat increasingly ‘genuine’: The Pro-Ject Debut Carbon is on the run to be the best entry-level hi-fi turntables you can purchase.

While vinyl newcomers may flinch at the value, the Debut Carbon is extremely an amazing deal. For the cash, you get an all-around made deck that is damped appropriately for fabulous sound quality. The carbon-fiber tonearm is lightweight and firm and is generally saved for turntables costing significantly more.

The Pro-Ject Debut Carbon is for the maturing lover that is focused on the record gathering leisure activity and on account of that dedication, it doesn’t highlight amenities like an auto-returning tonearm, buttons for changing pace or an included phono preamp. Novices might be turned off by the manual changing of the belt position to change speeds and the absence of an included preamp. Be that as it may, on the off chance that you need to separate more detail and goals from your records than the less expensive choices on this rundown, or on the off chance that you need to begin on the way of being a genuine vinyl collectors, the Debut Carbon is likely your most logical option.

Pros Cons
Excellent value for a hi-fi turntable Manual speed change
Easy to setup Requires a phono preamp

How We Picked

We relied on the opinion of experts and feedback of users based on four major factors: Design, Price, output ports/drives and Sound production.

More facts and data about these turntables were gotten from deep research and online reviews. With the result and feedback we got, we were able to rank each product according to the standard we set.

Looking at our review, each turntable has been carefully categorized according to our research result. Also, take note that the turntables that didn’t meet our standard were not included among this list.

Frequently Asked Questions

What makes a good turntable?

One of the most essential parts to search for when you’re looking for the best turntables is the way all-around damped it is.

Damping is basically the technique by which producers battle vibrations – regardless of whether interior or outer. They do this using distinctive motor designs and using different components.

More often than not, belt-driven turntables will be significantly calmer and offer higher devotion than their direct drive brother – as direct drive turntables have an engine that is legitimately associated with the platter. Be that as it may, there are some incredible direct drive turntables out there, so don’t discount them yet.

Your very own needs are significant as well, however, so remember about them. In case you’re simply beginning, you most likely don’t should dawdle with an unpredictable turntable with a movable vertical tracking point, hostile to skate, and azimuth. Would you like to tear your vinyl to your advanced library? Assuming this is the case, search for a turntable with a USB output and solid software to take care of business.

Some turntables have a preamp worked in. On the off chance that your turntable has a USB output, it has a built-in preamp. In the event that you do need an external preamp, you will need a set of links (more often than not RCA links) to connect to your audio framework. Preamps have a wide range with regard to building and sound quality.

Conclusion

If you want the best turntables, then you will look only for the best turntables. Check all the necessary specifications mentioned above before you purchase and choose what you really need.